UBM’s biannual menswear event, the all-under-one-roof Project and MRket shows, ran from Sunday to Tuesday at its usual home, The Javits Center, but was joined this season by a few female-only aisles that formed the Project Womens show, which had never been held concurrently with Project in New York before.

Although several exhibitors said that traffic was light, others reported excellent results.

Stylewise, there was not a whole lot of newness on display in the men’s category for the season. Many brands seemed to rely on tried-and-true spring options such as light-wash jeans, colored chinos and shorts and floral prints (bringing to mind that line from The Devil Wears Prada: “Florals for spring? Groundbreaking.”)

The dedicated denim area, Blue, was near the entrance of the show and included well-known names such as Paige and 7 for All Mankind as well as a handful of new brands. Reps from DL 1961, Slate and Blank NYC said that stretch for men continues to be important and that they were stressing lighter, somewhat retro-looking washes for summer.

 

Top picks from Project/MRket included:

 

Best retro prints: Reyn Spooner

The famous Hawaiian shirt maker has a new head designer, Doug Burkman of Burkman Bros, and he has mined the brand’s rich archive yet added his own modern spin to create a colorful yet contemporary collection for spring.

Reyn Spooner
Photo: SI Team
Reyn Spooner
 

Best reflection of the unisex trend: Selected People

This new line from Denmark’s Selected Homme technically has separate men’s and women’s pieces but its overall cool look is pretty genderless–and therefore übercool.

Selected People booth
Photo: SI Team
Selected People booth

Best interpretation of the ugly/Dad sneaker trend: Selected People

Selected People sneakers
Photo: SI Team
Selected People sneakers

These chunky models in somewhat questionable color choices are actually perfectly on trend.

 

Best imported jeans line: Salvatore Galliano

We had never seen this Italian label Stateside before but were impressed by its washes, distressing and unique use of patches.

Salvatore Galliano
Photo: SI Team
Salvatore Galliano

Best new denim line: Xabi LA

Launched eight months ago by a family who has been making jeans in Los Angeles for other brands for decades, this label is manufactured entirely in LA from Italian fabrics and retails between $160 and $190.



Xabi LA
Photo: SI Team
Xabi LA

Most versatile bag: Hamilton Perkins

This model, part of a collection that is made entirely from recycled materials such as old billboards, can be worn as a backpack or carried as a gym tote. Your choice!

Hamilton Perkins
Photo: SI Team
Hamilton Perkins

Best interpretation of the athletic side stripe on jeans: Robin’s Jean

We thought this red and camo variation was especially fresh.

Robin's Jean
Photo: SI Team
Robin's Jean

Nicest, chicest and easiest blazer: Serge Blanco

While the rest of the spring 2019 collection is very colorful and floral, this classic striped jacket in completely featherweight nylon seems like a buy that will be wearable for many summers to come.

Serge Blanco blazer
Photo: SI Team
Serge Blanco blazer

Best Elvis-inspired jean: Robin’s Jean

Studs? Check. Sparkles? Check. Side ankle zips? Check. The King would undoubtedly have approved. And, in addition to its core collection, Robin’s has also recently launched Red Label, a less expensive sub-label with jeans styles retailing for $239 to $269.

Robin's Jean
Photo: SI Team
Robin's Jean

Coolest denim jacket: Blank NYC

This bleached model truly stood out from the others on display at Blue.

BlankNYC jacket
Photo: SI Team
BlankNYC jacket

Nicest workwear inspired jacket: DL 1961

Workwear continues to be a huge influence on jeanswear for spring and this baby in a mellow blue captures the look rather perfectly.

DL1961 jacket
Photo: SI Team
DL1961 jacket


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