The latest edition of Première Vision held February 11-13, 2020, held at Parc Des Expositions, Paris, had to deal with some difficulties: The coronavirus–most of all–and the absence of some exhibitors and visitors from China as a result.

 

Gilles Lasbordes, managing director, PV, commented on the opening day of the show: “Due to the situation of coronavirus many of the buyers were unable to catch a flight. I don't know at the moment what are final figures but I am expecting very few Chinese buyers will be able to come to Europe and France. On the exhibitors’ side we counted 111 exhibitors from China registered at the show out of the total 1,745 participating. Forty-five exhibitors worldwide were not able to come here due to restrictions in terms of flights. While many exhibitors were able to be represented by their European agents or salesforce, others who were not able to come over here. As they were supposed to be located in the section ‘Manufacturing Overseas,’ we decided to close this section and move those who had managed to come in the section ‘Manufacturing and Knitwear’ in the Hall 6. We had to take this decision at the very last day before we started the show.”

 

In addition to such difficulties, a widespread anxiety about the present and future situation pervaded visitors’ and exhibitors’ conversations. However, very few people wore protective masks.

 

The first day of the show started very slowly, while from the afternoon and the second day, pavilions and halls were crowded and busy again and had a slightly less worried overall atmosphere.

 

Some exhibiting denim manufacturers offered new materials and low-impact fabrics. Among them, Prosperity presented an enlarged selection of items that are part of its Stella Blu line, a Made in Padua offer of products made with sustainable materials. This collection was born in 2018, though is now presenting a wider selection of products aimed at expanding the company’s offer of indigo fabrics beyond five-pockets. The line offers indigo fabrics characterized by new textures, weights and end-uses.

 

Evlox focused on Redenim, its overall offer of eco-friendly denim. Also betting on sustainable fabrics is Kipas Denim, whose selection is made up of 50% of eco-friendly denim made by using organic cotton, preconsumer and postconsumer recycled denim, though also eco-friendly fibers such as hemp and other sustainable resources including, for instance, Repreve.

Kipas Denim Hemp and cotton fabric
Photo: SI Team
Kipas Denim Hemp and cotton fabric

Bossa presented a selection of indigo corduroys and bright earthy hue fabrics.
Bossa Denim corduroy
Photo: SI Team
Bossa Denim corduroy

Advance Denim showed a new series of denims available in a vast selection of blue hues produced according to a less resource consuming and an eco-friendly dyeing system–Big Box Dyeing.  While conventional dyeing techniques use 15 to 17 different steps out of which about ten are dyeing dipping steps, Advance Denim’s system uses four steps for its dyeing process and a single dyeing bath. This way water, electricity, chemical can be reduced as well as gas and wastewater production.
Advance Denim
Photo: SI Team
Advance Denim

More innovation examples were also presented throughout the show. Among new eco-friendly products Albini, a shirting fabric specialist, and Iluna, a high-end lace manufacturer, presented their products dyed with vegetal natural dyes.

 

Limonta offered a selection of fabrics made with recycled nylon fibers, while Marzotto hawked a line of fabrics made with Tencel and wool, and Tencel and linen delivering great silky aspects, wrinkle-free and easy-care characteristics.

Limonta fabric made with recycled nylon
Photo: SI Team
Limonta fabric made with recycled nylon

Also highly innovative was Canclini’s new line of shirting fabrics made with recycled nylons and meant to create a series of highly functional shirts that can be folded inside a pocket and be carried everywhere. Also new is the Techno Shirt capsule made with high-performance fibers that need no ironing, are stretchy, easy-care and highly breathable.

 

Tintex launched a selection of new eco-friendly coatings added onto its fabrics that create fabrics that look like leather though they are 100% animal-free. It also launched a special double fabric that also uses recycled denim and Refibra.

Tintex fabric made with recycled denim and other fibers
Photo: SI Team
Tintex fabric made with recycled denim and other fibers

Naia, Eastman’s fully traceable from-tree-to-fiber cellulosic fiber, has launched what can be considered the first eco-friendly cellulosic staple fiber. The US company has already disclosed its filament fiber a few seasons ago, though this new fiber–which is produced through the same productive system of the filament–has inherent softness, dries quicker and reduces pilling more than other cellulosic fibers. It blends well with other eco-friendly materials such as Lyocell, Modal and recycled polyester and can be used to produce fabrics, knitwear and jersey garments.

 

Lenzing launched Tencel Modal fibers with Eco Pure technology. These cellulosic fibers are manufactured with a proven total chlorine-free bleaching process in pulp and fibers. Thanks to the new technology they tend to be softer than conventionally bleached Tencel Modal fibers and can be less harmful to nature when produced. Moreover they can be identified throughout the textile production chain.




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