Despite some cancellations due to the coronavirus, Paris Fashion Week took place in the usual form: Well over 100 shows, numerous presentations and showrooms were on the program and were complemented by the three major fairs, Tranoi, Première Classe and Man/Woman. SI took a look around and analyzed the most important trends spotted in the French capital.

 

’70s bourgeoisie
The revival of the ’70s, which Hedi Slimane heralded for Celine three seasons ago, has now reached the commercial sector and is about to become one of the most important trends of the upcoming winter season. It is important to note that hippie fashion is not being revived as in the comebacks of the past decades, but that the bourgeois side of ‘70s fashion has been resurrected. It's all about the era of big parties in colorful long dresses and style icons such as Bianca Jagger, Jackie Onassis, Ursula Andress, Loulou de la Falaise and Betty Catroux, whose style is currently also the subject of an exhibition at the Yves Saint Laurent Museum. This trend is implemented in a total look consisting of boot-cut trousers, elegant midi dresses, sloppy and ruched blouses, feminine trouser suits, costumes and mini skirts made of leather. Accessories such as eye-catching belts, large sunglasses, patchwork style bags complete the style. Shoes are dominated by high, narrow shaft boots and platform pumps. Materials such as corduroy, denim and English wool fabrics are coming back. With this trend, there is also again another revival of lambskin, which is used in bags, jackets and coats. Representatives of vegan fashion, such as Stella McCartney, decline the fluffy surfaces with imitation fur made of wool. Non-degradable synthetic fibers such as polyester and polyamide are on the retreat in the face of the new zero-plastic movement in the high genre.

Celine flower dress
Photo: SI Team
Celine flower dress
Roger Vivier suede leather boots 70s
Photo: SI Team
Roger Vivier suede leather boots 70s
Dior
Photo: SI Team
Dior
Maje fake lambskin
Photo: SI Team
Maje fake lambskin

Chunky knit with patterns
Numerous manufacturers are responding to the current trend towards cocooning with cuddly knits. This can be seen as a side product of the ‘70s revival, too. Valuable chunky knitwear in thick qualities is given a new and familiar touch by colorful patterns. Norwegian patterns are making a comeback and are available in a wide variety of color combinations. Fantasy patterns in bright colors complete the range. A lot of mohair will be processed in the coming winter season, but also fine cashmere qualities and wool blends.

Zadig & Voltaire
Photo: SI Team
Zadig & Voltaire
Cynthia & Xiao knit sweater
Photo: SI Team
Cynthia & Xiao knit sweater

Denim with decorative elements
The influence of the ’70s has an impact on denim as well. There are many wide cuts, boot-cut and high-waist looks on offer. And with this comes back a measured decoration of denim: metal buttons, covered buttons and rivets enhance the pieces. Slips, belts, ruffles and embroideries add decorative aspects. The specialists from Shaft and the young designer Guiseppe Buccinna are showing a new type of denim fabric. Both used a new development from Italy, in which one side of the fabric is flocked with a polyester layer so that the denim takes on the appearance of leather or velour. Completely new are down jackets made of denim, as seen in Tatras and Zadig & Voltaire. Y/Project has once again invented a new denim trouser shape with open crotch and high-waist, which sits like a sculpture on the hips.

Celine denim jacket
Photo: SI Team
Celine denim jacket
Denim down jacket by Tatras
Photo: SI Team
Denim down jacket by Tatras
Y/Project denim pants
Photo: SI Team
Y/Project denim pants
Dhurv Kapoor
Photo: SI Team
Dhurv Kapoor

New objectivity
Alongside the bourgeoisie in the style of the ’70s, a formal objectivity is back in fashion. In view of the continuing difficult economic situation and the ongoing discussions about the environmental impact of the fashion industry, which produces too much and disposes of too much, there is a clear tendency towards classicism and rationality. Within this framework, classic costumes, trouser suits and straight cuts in coats and waistcoats are coming back into fashion. The color palette is sober and sustainable: white, black, gray, navy blue, natural shades and perennial favorites such as checks in these colors are to be found in most collections. “The less, the more” is the motto. Even designers renowned for their innovation, such as Marine Serre, J.W. Anderson for Loewe and Demna Gvasalia for Balenciaga, have committed themselves to this new objectivity.

Nanushka
Photo: SI Team
Nanushka
Bureau de Stil
Photo: SI Team
Bureau de Stil

Trend color: Gold
In view of the new rationality in fashion, a little glamour is also needed. It comes in the form of the color gold. Embroideries with gold threads, sequins or lurex qualities enhance trousers, dresses and jackets and make them suitable for parties. Pieces in gold can be found in both designer and commercial collections. The color also combines well with the autumnal brown tones, which are very much in vogue, the color classics of the new objectivity and the few specks of green, cobalt blue and pink.

Y/Project
Photo: SI Team
Y/Project
Celine
Photo: SI Team
Celine


READ ALSO: 
COVID-19 affects Paris trade shows: “It will be a very difficult season”

Trade Shows

COVID-19 affects Paris trade shows: “It will be a very difficult season”

Read more →
Kingpins Amsterdam: New location

Trade Shows

Kingpins Amsterdam is cancelled

Read more →
jörg-wichmann-panorama

Trade Shows

Jörg Wichmann: "You don't just file a petition for bankruptcy"

Read more →
Green thumbs up for Neonyt

Trade Shows

Berlin trade shows: Keep calm and keep up business

Read more →