Ahead of the menswear shows in Paris from June 19-25, there were some announcements regarding new fairs. In the spring of 2018, it seemed that the omission of the Capsule fair would more than be compensated. But it turned out differently:

WSN retired exhibition project June

In January 2018 WSN, the organizer of Who's Next and Première Classe, announced a new, additional show codenamed “June,” which was designed to cover the important and high-selling pre-collections. However, WSN’s recently appointed CEO Fréderic Maus announced in early April that the new show would not take place as planned, and that the project, which was launched before his arrival at the company, will be implemented in a “phygital form.” Specifically, a new online platform should be set up and digital and printed services should be made available to the buyers. However, the online platform was not yet installed at the time of the men's fair.

Outside at the Hotel Evreux
Photo: Barbara Market
Outside at the Hotel Evreux

CIFF postponed appearance in Paris until 2019

CIFF, the Copenhagen International Fashion Fair, was also due to come to Paris in June. Or so the fair announced at its most recent show in Denmark with a sign at the entrance. Unfortunately, the time was too tight to realize it. Marketing director Sara Ranzini told the French press: "For planning and logistics reasons, we did not had enough the time to finish in June–because of the organization of the Copenhagen and our Art Fair. We also had difficulties finding a suitable location in Paris. That's why we're now planning for 2019.” The project, which aims to present the best Scandinavian brands, was instead brought to mind during a dinner and a small party for the press and select buyers.

Tranoi Skateroom
Photo: Barbara Markert
Tranoi Skateroom

Tranoi focused on the Palais de la Bourse

This season, the Tranoi Fashion Fair reduced the offer to two locations: the Carreau du Temple paused and the exhibitors were focused on the Palais de La Bourse. Instead the Tranoi Week continued like in previous seasons with an art gallery location in the trendy Marais district and in collaboration with the London Show Rooms. There, 23 designers showed their collections, including three designers from China, including Angus Chiang, who found its way to Paris thanks to a cooperation with the Tube Showroom in Shanghai. The former stock exchange La Bourse was the main location and had a selection of 150 brands from 30 countries. In addition to the men's fashion, the pre-collections of women's fashion were shown, positioned by the organizers around David Hadida, especially in the large hall on the ground floor. Men's Fashion was divided into three universes: Zeitgeist for trendsetters, Rule Breaker for avant-garde and Hype Society for street culture. On a positive note, the whole fair was organized much more airily. The stands were larger and arranged with more spaces. So the offer seemed much more curated than in the past seasons. There was also much greater emphasis on international labels unknown in Europe, such as the Hong Kong brand PCYCL, which uses recycled polyamide, or the Japanese brand Aldies, which offers unisex streetwear styles. Special areas were created for Belgian brand The Skateroom, which produces unique boards together with artists, the proceeds of which support NGOs, and for Cacharel, which celebrates its 60th anniversary. The announced new online platform, which is to further expand the offer, had not yet gone online until the men's fashion week.



Japanese streetwear brand Aldies at Tranoi
Photo: Barbara Markert
Japanese streetwear brand Aldies at Tranoi

PCYCL clothing made of recycled polyamide
Photo: Barbara Markert
PCYCL clothing made of recycled polyamide


Man/Woman with own hall for womenswear

While the other Parisian trade fair offerings were reduced, Man/Woman expanded its exhibitor numbers. This time, 101 brands were represented, divided into two locations: the basement and the ground floor of the Vendôme Pavilion, as well as two remote halls in the Hôtel d'Evreux. The women's fashion was mainly concentrated in the Salle des Tirages, while most shoe and accessories labels were housed in the Classes salons. There was also a public viewing area for the World Cup. For Bryan York from the London label M.C. Overalls this location was advantageous: “After the matches, people pass in droves. That's when I won new customers.”

Hotel Evreux from inside
Photo: Barbara Markert
Hotel Evreux from inside

London label M.C. Overalls
Photo: Barbara Markert
London label M.C. Overalls


In addition to the two trade fair venues, the fair also offers the under its retail branch called Small the opportunity for international retailers or brands that already have a physical store or an online platform to test a new market located in the new contemporary fashion district of Paris, between the Sentier and the Marais. The street Notre Dame de Nazareth is developing more and more into an alternative location for showrooms, which have been increasing in numbers this season. Exactly there is located the pop-up area of Small, which was awarded this season to Mr. Green from Los Angeles. The cult shop in California specializes in the culture of cannabis smoking and offers fashion alongside pottery, pipes, literature, music and apothecary goods based around the cannabis plant.

The street Notre Dame de Nazareth
Photo: Barbara Markert
The street Notre Dame de Nazareth
Mr Green showroom at Notre Dame de Nazareth
Photo: Barbara Markert
Mr Green showroom at Notre Dame de Nazareth
Mr Green canabis jacket
Photo: Barbara Markert
Mr Green canabis jacket

Trends: more color, more utilitywear and a return to classic and history

The walk through the fairs and showrooms showed that it will definitely be more colorful for the men in the coming summer fashion. Trend color number 1 is a rich yellow that can sometimes reappear in small neon yellow details on sneakers or sweaters. See Editions M.R., Louis Vuitton by Virgil Abloh, Dries Van Noten. Basically, the color combinations have become daring again. This also contrasts well with the more purist denim collections, which are all about showing the denim in its original beauty, such as at Natural Selection from London or also A.P.C. The classic comes again with strict polo shirts in the style of the ’50s and ’60s, classic sweaters and stiff protruding bermuda shorts.

Yellow jacket by Editions M.R.
Photo: Barbara Markert
Yellow jacket by Editions M.R.
Yellow details at Dries Van Noten
Photo: Barbara Markert
Yellow details at Dries Van Noten
Bermuda by Dries Van Noten
Photo: Barbara Markert
Bermuda by Dries Van Noten
Sneaker with yellow details by APC
Photo: Barbara Markert
Sneaker with yellow details by APC
Neon at Louis Vuitton by Virgil Abloh
Photo: Barbara Markert
Neon at Louis Vuitton by Virgil Abloh
Purist denim collections, such as at Natural Selection
Photo: Barbara Markert
Purist denim collections, such as at Natural Selection
Overalls by APC
Photo: Barbara Markert
Overalls by APC
The classic polo shirt returns at Editions M.R.
Photo: Barbara Markert
The classic polo shirt returns at Editions M.R.
Polo shirt by Drop out
Photo: Barbara Markert
Polo shirt by Drop out

In addition, brands with a real story remain important: Very often the brand message is about recycling or heritage. Old cotton mills are being brought to life again. People are proud of a local production or a high percentage of eco-responsibility. See the following examples: The Japanese brand JiB, who have been making indestructible canvas bags for 40 years (Tranoi). At the Portuguese label La Paz 15% of the collection is made from recycled materials (Man/Woman). Or: Snow Peak has been a specialist in camping for 60 years (Man/Woman). The brand from Tokyo makes everything from the tent to the kettle and since four years also fashion. Kei Saito, senior manager, said, "Most people are badly dressed when camping. We want to change that.”

Recycling was a big thing, such as at PCYCL
Photo: Barbara Markert
Recycling was a big thing, such as at PCYCL

At the Portuguese label La Paz 15% of the collection is made from recycled materials
Photo: Barbara Markert
At the Portuguese label La Paz 15% of the collection is made from recycled materials

Utilitarian at Louis Vuitton by Virgil Abloh
Photo: Barbara Markert
Utilitarian at Louis Vuitton by Virgil Abloh


With this utilitywear, the Japanese are completely in trend. In many collections you can find fashionable versions of fishing- or photographer jackets and designs that look like bulletproof vests. Many belts, trousers and coats are provided with large patch pockets. As a result, the military trend, which has been ongoing for years, is being further extended and becoming a real classic.

Utility wear continues at Latesca
Photo: Barbara Markert
Utility wear continues at Latesca

Fashionable versions of fishing- or photographer jackets at Ovadia and Sons' collection
Photo: Barbara Markert
Fashionable versions of fishing- or photographer jackets at Ovadia and Sons' collection



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