Soorty has recently partnered with The Fabricant, a digital fashion house from Amsterdam. Together they developed a system through which they can create a 3D animated design system for presenting real denim garments without using any raw materials and processes. The first result of this custom-made collaboration was C2C Gold launched during the October 2018 edition of Kingpins Amsterdam.

 

The Fabricant can combine tools from the film visual effects industry such as motion-capture 3D animation software and body scanning and can produce hyper-real digital fashion experiences including digital fashion shows and digital retail experiences, as seen during Pitti Immagine’s EP Summit in Milan in November 2018 (also see: https://www.sportswear-international.com/news/stories/Summit-The-best-quotes-from-the-EP-Summits-discussion-of-fashion-and-tech-14436).

"Digital design techniques will save massive amounts of waste and unnecessary sample transportation," Kerry Murphy, co-founder The Fabricant
Photo: Madeleine-Sars
"Digital design techniques will save massive amounts of waste and unnecessary sample transportation," Kerry Murphy, co-founder The Fabricant

 

“We focus on three aspects of the industry – design, visualization and fitting,” explained Amber Slooten and Kerry Murphy, co-founders The Fabricant. “While visualizations are on the foreground of our business model, we are also aiming to inspire the industry to adopt the digital design techniques that will inspire new ways of working. Additionally, it will save massive amounts of waste, unnecessary sample transportation and allow for rapid prototyping while increasing sustainability and creativity,” they explained.

“We focus on three aspects of the industry – design, visualization and fitting,” Amber Slooten, co-founder The Fabricant
Photo: Madeleine Sars
“We focus on three aspects of the industry – design, visualization and fitting,” Amber Slooten, co-founder The Fabricant

 

Such visualizations can also be used to invent new ways of presenting fashion. For example, they created their own Deep digital fashion collection designed with the aid of artificial intelligence algorithms and presented it as an alternative to the fashion catwalk at three different locations and events exactly at the same time. “This way we can avoid having to ship collections around the world. We can do that with one click of a button through our e-mail,” they explained.

“We are not willing to abandon physical sample collection production, at least not yet,” Ebru Debbag, executive director of global sales and marketing, Soorty
Photo: Soorty
“We are not willing to abandon physical sample collection production, at least not yet,” Ebru Debbag, executive director of global sales and marketing, Soorty

 

The system can also be employed for “phygital” retail experience, a mixing of digital e-commerce shopping experience with the physical retail experience, and when using digital changing room–as they are now experimenting with a Hong Kong luxury retail by getting consumers to purchase without even touching a real piece of clothing, but only showing products in their digital 3-D versions.


The recent collaboration with Soorty offered the denim specialist the possibility to explore new communication and process paths. “In our age digital content has both the appeal and the right tone to communicate important messages and details,” commented Ebru Debbag, executive director of global sales and marketing, Soorty.

 

“We are not willing to abandon physical sample collection production, at least not yet,” she added. “We still have to touch and feel fabrics and garments. However, creating digital samples will help understanding consumer taste at a much earlier stage so that we can develop and design accordingly. The targeted design and development stage will enable us to produce the right items consumers will be willing to buy and thus move us closer to our aim to reduce or reach zero waste, while interacting with our customers and conveying them information about traceable manufacturing.”