Since its foundation in 2012, Frame has evolved from a premium denim label to a fashion brand with four annual ready-to-wear collections. Just as the company's headquarters are spread across Los Angeles and London, Frame's look is an aesthetic between Californian casualness and European coolness. Sustainable production has been always on the agenda, since 2019 at the latest with the launch of the ‘Sustainable Denim’ collection.

With the 'Le One' a new jeans fit has just been presented, which allows for one size to fit a range of different waists, up to six traditional sizes. The jeans are made of organic cotton and recycled polyester with 100% stretchability.
Yesterday saw the debut of 'Responsible Leather’, according to Frame a “traceable leather that offers full transparency and traceability of all raw materials and factory conditions, ensuring that workers receive fair wages and good working conditions, animals are treated ethically, and high standards of sustainability are upheld in every step of production”.

We asked co-founders and co-creative directors, Jens Grede and Erik Torstensson, about these product launches and what their trend forecast for 2021 looks like, especially in the denim segment.

Jens Grede, Frame
Photo: Frame
Jens Grede, Frame
Since its start in 2012, please describe the fundamental actions you have taken in terms of sustainable production.
Jens Grede: Sustainability had been a focus of ours for a few years before we launched our first organic cotton denim and recycled cashmere in 2019. From there, our efforts grew to include Bluesign-certified silk, organic pima cotton, and most recently, Responsible Leather.


Erik Torstensson: We started by looking internally, at ourselves and our team, to identify the ways in which Frame can truly make a difference in its practices. It became clear to us that we needed to focus on our core materials and make changes that were incrementally going to impact how we create our collections.

 

What fabrics partners do you work with?
Erik: Most recently we teamed up with Real Grade Leather (RGL), out of New Zealand to source the leathers. The aspects they focus on are animal welfare, labor welfare, traceability, and ecology. Along with governmental bodies, RGL tracks the cycle from the farm, where the skin is a by-product from animals raised for the meat and ensures the 5 Freedoms are protected, to the Fair Trade practices that protect the workers’ rights.

Puffer jacket made with Frame's new Responsible Leather
Photo: Frame
Puffer jacket made with Frame's new Responsible Leather
What's your goal when it comes to sustainability? 
Jens: We’ve committed that by Winter 2021, Frame’s denim pocket linings will contain 30% recycled polyester, which equals to about 1 recycled water bottle per jean. We’re also looking at how we use packaging across our entire business, which will be our next big push, followed by ensuring at least 50% of our denim washes will be sustainable by autumn/winter 2021.

 

Erik: Our sustainability goals are tied to our core product offering and the primary materials we’re using. That means constantly asking ourselves if we can push things further and source greener alternatives.

Erik Torstensson, Frame
Photo: Frame
Erik Torstensson, Frame
Please tell us about your new denim fit ‘Le One’...
Jens: Le One Skinny was a huge moment for us in terms of pushing denim innovation to the limit. The way the material is designed, it allows for one size to fit up to six traditional sizes, bringing movement and flexibility to jeans without losing shape. We worked closely with Calik Denim to develop them and are thrilled with the feedback we’ve received so far.

 

Currently loungewear and casual clothes have a momentum. What are the chances of denim to become more popular again?
Erik: At the end of the day, denim is a wardrobe staple. I believe that in a post-COVID world, we’ll see a return to dressing up, but we’ve found even in recent months that customers want a hybrid of comfort and quality that will last beyond the current Work-From-Home lifestyle. They’re looking for pieces that have flexibility and substance, and I think that will continue. It’ll be important for brands that offer denim to diversify their offerings and create collections that can have a life during and after the pandemic.

 

What denim trends do you foresee for 2021
Jens: Overall, I believe we’ll continue to see an emphasis on relaxed fits and boyish silhouettes through 2021. It’s due in part to the comfort that customers want these days, but also it is also informed by trends we’ve been seeing for a few seasons. There’s an ease in dressing with denim that will remain a major trend in the coming months.



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