By Lorenzo Molina

Each winter morning, most of you have to face that one critical moment, having to slip out of the coziness of your pajamas, leaving the warm comfort after long hours of pleasant wear to then throw yourself abruptly into the daily routine. At first, no one knew exactly if models on international catwalks got also rebellious against the fact of working so intensely during fashion week that they decided to show up in their sleepwear as some kind of protest or whether it was actually a designers’ amusement.

The Pajama style has been trying to break through as a sidewalk trend for several years now. Luxury fashion houses like Dolce&Gabbana already tried to convince us in spring/summer 2009 that knotted silk nightgowns are street-ready if paired with heels and purses. Other designers followed and some thought that nightwear in daylight was here to stay. “It is actually the perfect match for the athleisure movement”, some fashion businessman must have thought back in 2014. And here is how the fictional inner dialog follows: “If people wear running tights under shorts to hit the club or have a drink in the coolest bar in town, why wouldn’t they also show off their pajamas proudly?” But this equation hasn’t worked out yet, as I still haven’t seen anyone in the streets falling for this trend.

Louis Vuitton spring/summer'16
Louis Vuitton spring/summer'16


For this summer season, Louis Vuitton offers men button front satin pajamas to be worn with the indispensable white sneakers. It is a very rakish way of dressing, hence the line between coolness and embarrassment is sometimes very thin, so that I don’t see this take settling down within the mainstream. However, I don’t want you to get me wrong –if sleepwear is being treated at great length here, it is because I do see a certain potential in the whole thing.

How? Some contemporary brands are embracing a light version of the whole nightwear craze, especially in form of notch-collar shirts for ladies paired with velour suits (Topshop Boutique FW’16). Generally speaking, nightwear tops could be appealing when combined with jeans and sneakers to spice up the look. Important in order to kill the sleepy appearance of this garments is the adaption of cool prints and motifs (see Drone’s short-sleeved shirt). 5Preview’s imagery for the forthcoming cold season reminds of baggy velour pajamas at ease, but they remain wearable. But please, avoid getting out there wearing Katie Eary’s nightwear-meets-daylight proposals next winter –as there are already enough conflicts, wars and scandals out there to make us want to stay in bed forever.

The wearble thing out of the sleepwear craze: notch-collar shirts (Topshop Boutique)
The wearble thing out of the sleepwear craze: notch-collar shirts (Topshop Boutique)

A nod to pajama dressing but in a graceful way: 5Preview FW'16
A nod to pajama dressing but in a graceful way: 5Preview FW'16

J'ai mal à la tete spring/summer'16
J'ai mal à la tete spring/summer'16