While the official prêt-à-porter calendar only came to an end yesterday (and many of the countless showrooms still in full swing), most of the Parisian women’s trade shows closed their spring/summer ’17 run on Monday. One thing is for sure: There have been plenty of things to see.

Tranoi's settlement at La Bourse
© M. Hunstig
Tranoi's settlement at La Bourse

Tranoi’s ca. 650 womenswear exhibitors were once again spread out over three locations: Next to the classic and history-loaded venues of the Louvre and La Bourse, this season the trade show firstly also occupied the more far out Cité de la Mode by the other side of the Seine (which could most beautifully be reached by the show’s own boat shuttle). All venues hosted a similar, very international (even exotic) mix of womenswear and accessory brands from new to established, sporty to dressy and clean to pompous without clear segmentation, which made a quick orientation rather difficult.

Stutterheim at WOMAN
© M. Hunstig
Stutterheim at WOMAN

In its regular home near République, WOMAN hosted roundabout 100 brands from the upper casual segment in its cozy, family-like atmosphere. While big draft horses were missing (the likes of Hope, YMC, or Stutterheim made the exception), there were lots of interesting newcomers to spot, especially from the US and the Asian continent. In the entrance building, The Berlin Showroom brought a reduced selection (11) of some of Germany’s most interesting fashion designers to the Paris audience.

Denim shorts by Schmidttakahashi at the Berlin Showroom
© M. Hunstig
Denim shorts by Schmidttakahashi at the Berlin Showroom

At the Tuileries Gardens, Premiere Classe hosted Paris’ largest selection of footwear, bags, accessories and jewelry with almost 500, both famous and less known exhibitors, subdivided into three tents. Vis-à-vis, the show’s ready-to-wear concept, Paris sur Mode, showed ca. 100 clothing brands plus the newly established Don’t Believe the Hype area with 15 brands including interesting names such as Lupe or Sunspel and an incorporated mini-version of the Capsule trade show. Capsule’s ca. 35 exhibitors surely brought some freshness into the Paris Sur Mode portfolio, especially with US names like Oak or the labels of the Flying Solo collective (Daniel Silverstain and others), but the show-in-show did feel a bit lost in its place.

Oak at Capsule
© M. Hunstig
Oak at Capsule

All in all, it did feel like all the important buyers did show up in Paris once again – and clearly Paris has the most international audience of all European trade show grounds. Antoine Floch, co-founder and director of the MAN/WOMAN shows reported on a 90% international visitorship of which many are from the Far (Japan, Korea, China) and Near East (United Emirates), the USA and continental Europe.  But besides their busy showroom schedules, not all of them took too much time to spend at the trade shows – as it’s so late in the season, many didn’t have a budget to spend on new brands anyways and even exhibiting brands reported that they’d actually have problems to start production in time if orders were getting in any later than really during the shows.

Trend-wise, several design tendencies consolidated while new inspiration could be caught. Here's a best-of listing of the most striking trends and brands we came across at the show grounds.

Detail to watch: Frills and flounces catered for a feminine add-on in many, otherwise rather minimalist collections.

Yune Ho at WOMAN
© M. Hunstig
Yune Ho at WOMAN


Best sweatwear: Can Pep Rev not only had the nicest booth layout and decoration at WOMAN, their minimalist clothing is fab, too. Most striking: their sweatshirts made from a super thick but super soft Japanese cotton quality.
Can Pep Rev at WOMAN
© M. Hunstig
Can Pep Rev at WOMAN


Most popular denim: Customized denim jackets were seen all over the place with decoration stretching from simple stitchings to paint or even pearly applications.
That's it Folks at Tranoi
© M. Hunstig
That's it Folks at Tranoi
DA/OOD at Tranoi
© M. Hunstig
DA/OOD at Tranoi


The it-piece: Elaborately embroidered tunics - the rich range by Ukranian label March 11 was super popular.
March 11 at Tranoi
© M. Hunstig
March 11 at Tranoi


Material in demand: Soft leathers played a major role - not only in jackets, but also pants and shorts.
Eight Dreams at Tranoi
© M. Hunstig
Eight Dreams at Tranoi
Elisa Biroli at Tranoi
© M. Hunstig
Elisa Biroli at Tranoi


New life: The classic shirt is currently transformed into a new it-piece with the help of several new construction methods ranging from open seams, knots, and asymetrical designs.
Rue Blanche at WOMAN
© M. Hunstig
Rue Blanche at WOMAN
Shaina Mote at WOMAN
© M. Hunstig
Shaina Mote at WOMAN
Ludmila Corlatenau at Tranoi
© M. Hunstig
Ludmila Corlatenau at Tranoi


New footwear: RK from Beirut, Lebanon, makes comfy flats out of rubber. Hottest design: the transparent slippers.
RK at Tranoi
© M. Hunstig
RK at Tranoi