Eurojersey, specialized Italian warp-knit fabric manufacturer of the Sensitive Fabrics by Eurojersey, has hosted the spring edition of the Antia convention, an Italian association of technical professionals “Sustainability as value of Made in”. The convention meant to present virtuous examples of companies that have been pursuing criteria such as sustainability, transparency and track-ability, and who reached successful results.

The convention hosted Alberto Gregotti, president of Antia, Andrea Crespi, general manager of Eurojersey and sustainability representative of the Sistema Moda Italia association, Luca Buttarelli, sales manager Italy at Cotonificio Albini, Gianluigi Candiani, CEO of Candiani Denim, Claudio Marenzi, president of Herno, and president of Sistema Moda Italia, Alfonso Saibene Canepa, member of board of directors and supply chain, and trend expert and editor of View Textile Publications, David Shah. Moderator was Marc Sondermann, CEO and director of Fashion Magazine.

Speakers at the Antia convention (from left): Luca Buttarelli (Cotonificio Albini), Gianluigi Candiani (Candiani Denim), Claudio Marenzi (Herno/SMI), Andrea Crespi (Eurojersey/SMI), Alfonso Saibene Canepa (Canepa), Marc Sondermann (Fashion)
© Eurojersey
Speakers at the Antia convention (from left): Luca Buttarelli (Cotonificio Albini), Gianluigi Candiani (Candiani Denim), Claudio Marenzi (Herno/SMI), Andrea Crespi (Eurojersey/SMI), Alfonso Saibene Canepa (Canepa), Marc Sondermann (Fashion)

Eurojersey is strongly committed to supporting ecofriendly and sustainable issues for many years. Since 2007 they have invested €50 million in order to make their company become more environmentally-friendly, while increasing productivity, efficiency and cutting their emissions, energy and water employ, and waste. “There are two ways through which a company can reach significant eco-friendly results,” explained Crespi during the convention. “One is to obtain certifications and the other is to create a transparent and trackable company. We did both.” And continues: “Right now a company has to guarantee excellence in four fields – quality, product, price and service. In the future they will have to guarantee a fifth excellence – sustainability. Today it can represent an added plus, tomorrow it will be indispensable. If you don’t succeed your company will be out of the game.”

“There are two ways through which a company can reach significant eco-friendly results. One is to obtain certifications and the other is to create a transparent and trackable company. We did both.”

Andrea Crespi, general manager of Eurojersey

Since 2007 Eurojersey has started its SensitiveEcoSystem project and has now reached a series of top results certified by external specialized companies. “We started measuring what was our company’s impact on the environment and got our EPD certification,” he explains. “Thanks to it we can certify what are our CO2 emissions, both as a company and according to each product category we produce. Being sustainable is important because you avoid waste and you can make profits. If you don’t make profits you better start doing something else.”

Eurojersey have also developed Eco-Print, a special printing technique through which they can save 60% water, 30% energy and 60% gas emissions, while producing high-definition quality pattern fabrics.

The company is now producing 130,000 kWh energy employed for satisfying the needs of their offices thanks to own photovoltaic plants. They reduced between 20% and 55% of their energy employ saving 700,000 kWh yearly. They save and reuse 30 million liters of water from their own plants, 4,000 meters of cellophane and 9,000 carton tubes. They also recycle 55,000 kilos of selvedges (a quantity of material that can be compared with yarn employed for producing 200,000 t-shirts). These textile remains are grinded and re-employed by an external specialized company producing plastic objects.

Purification plant by Eurojersey
© Eurojersey
Purification plant by Eurojersey

Eurojersey also announced that they will soon be launching a new fabric made with fibers obtained by regenerated own fabrics. The new Sensitive Fabric will be made with regenerated nylon produced for them by manufacturer Aquafil.

Other participants explained how being part of the Italian productive value chain and following specific sustainable and trackable standards makes a difference. Among them, Candiani Denim’s Gianluigi Candiani commented: “Nowadays denim is produced all over the world and only a few ones are made in Italy. And since we sensitized our clients about such difference a significant group of clients showed interest for informing their clients about it. For this we created our special Golden Rivet, a Candiani Denim branded golden rivet they can apply on their jeans,” he explained while pointing out that they also created a development center in their Italian offices – replicated also in LA – in order to show their clients how to wash, treat and interpret their denim at best.