The two fairs share the Postbahnhof Building in East Berlin. Tuesday morning at the kickoff, everything is still quite calm when entering the venue, the atmosphere is invitingly relaxed. Time for a little walk across the booths to get a first overview.  Entering the old brickhouse from the patio, the Greenshowroom has its place.

Wandering across the ground floor area, the motive of the fair becomes clear soon. It is all about sustainability, (vegan) alternative materials and closing the circle. Brands such as Mud Jeans have developed a whole new model of purchasing or rather “renting” garments. Being a familiar term in the car industry, leasing has entered the fashion world and promotes a more conscious way of always wearing the latest trends. The Amsterdam-based brand offers to lease their products for a year, sort of probation to rethink, if the purchased good is worth having, or if it’s given back for another customer to enjoy or to get recycled - depending on the condition. Other brands exhibiting their collections bet on the material, rather than the purchasing circle. Nae and Langbrett, for example, make their shoes and bags from recycled plastic bottles or raffia. The Salonshow, partnering with Lavera, features a lot of floral and ethno outfits, mostly kind of classical “green” looks actually. Outstanding in this show might be Hamburg brand Nine to Five, who delivers modern looks, organic leather shoes and handbags.

Another Hamburg-based brand which breaks ranks is Jan ’n June in cooperation with Design for Circularity. Having won the award for newcomer green designers, the two brands have also developed a circularity system, including the possibility to lease clothing. Using fabrics made from marine trash or plastic bottles, the styles come out very clean and chic. The collaboration could exhibit their collection at the end of the Ethical Fashion On Stage where all eyes were on them. Still, Juliana Holtzheimer, part of the design team behind Jan ’n June is missing something at the fair: “There is still a lack of conventional retailers. Green design should be much more important nowadays.”

So, next to seemingly more “old-fashioned” green designs, there are some newcomer brands who take eco to the next level and transport it into the present.  Nevertheless, the two sister fairs are still growing and developing and sustainability might still need some time until it finds its place in the fashion industry. 



Show Highlights

Accessories & shoe trends: Bold and color-blocking designs

Nine to Five
© R.Diehl
Nine to Five


Nine to Five
© R. Diehl
Nine to Five


Newcomers: Young green brands bet on clean chic

Jan 'n June X Design for Circularity
© R. Diehl
Jan 'n June X Design for Circularity


Jan 'n June
© R. Diehl
Jan 'n June


Jeans: The leasing model takes over the branch 

Mud Jeans
© R. Diehl
Mud Jeans


For more information on trade shows check out DFV Group’s expocheck.com.