Swedish technical sportswear connoisseur Peak Performance just unveiled its urban sportswear collection for FW’17 –and it just gives visual evidence that the marriage between sports gear and fit-for-the-city outfits looks like a “happily ever after” one. The range was inspired by military clothing and ‘90s football equipment, while also nodding to the acid house and techno scene from the same decade.

Peak Performance FW'17 Urban Collection.
© Peak Performance
Peak Performance FW'17 Urban Collection.

Peak Performance FW'17 Urban Collection.
© Peak Performance
Peak Performance FW'17 Urban Collection.

"During the development of this collection, we were concerned with fear. We wanted to give space to this fear in our process to go a step further," said Sofia Gromark Norinder, head of urban design. "We had this vision of a uniform that gives us a sense of security and identity, a shield from the world out there."



Peak Performance FW'17 Urban Collection.
© Peak Performance
Peak Performance FW'17 Urban Collection.

Peak Performance FW'17 Urban Collection.
© Peak Performance
Peak Performance FW'17 Urban Collection.

A delicate, harmonious game of volumes and textures is a constant throughout the collection. The outerwear pieces –parkas, bomber- and light down jackets– are crafted in water- and windproof materials like triple-layer Gore-Tex, besides others like faux leather for details.

Peak Performance FW'17 Urban Collection.
© Peak Performance
Peak Performance FW'17 Urban Collection.

Peak Performance FW'17 Urban Collection.
© Peak Performance
Peak Performance FW'17 Urban Collection.

Next fall, Peak Performance is also releasing a first-ever partnership with an independent designer since its foundation in 1986. British designer Nigel Cabourn, known for its penchant for workwear and functional clothing has developed with the brand a capsule range of high-technical ski- and urbanwear. Inspired by Swedish military clothing, the collection presents 20 unisex garments ranging from sheepskin coats to ski pants that could be both worn in- and off the slopes. 



  

"Street fashion is currently very focused on functional and military clothing, both of which we find very appealing. Today people don’t want to just look good –they are ready to integrate sport in their everyday lives,” added Sofia Gromark Norinder.