The ninth edition of Scoop International (1-3 February) closed its doors on Tuesday night. This season marked the return to one venue – four floors at the Saatchi Gallery off the King’s Road– ending the impractical dual-location affair of the last couple of seasons. The event was busy during our visit on the second day and several new brands had joined the line-up. French contender Vanessa Bruno Athé made its UK trade show debut with a collection that struck a balance between prettiness and effortless modernity. Highlights included a grey felt bomber jacket and a shirtdress crafted from a denim-look fabric, with signature ruching applied at the top of the sleeve and yoke. Vanessa Athé’s UK sale agent Ainjali Fine seemed pleased with her choice of trade show:

A piece from Mads Norgaard, Scoop International
A piece from Mads Norgaard, Scoop International
–The brand has been very well received in London and the booth was very busy on the first day; we had a steady stream of visitors on the second day, too. We’ve written orders with UK and international buyers from small indies to major retailers.

As already established during the men’s shows earlier in the year, fall/winter ‘15 is the season of texture.  Angora, extra bobbly boucle, mohair and a material simply referred to by brand representatives as “teddy bear fluff” cropped up in almost every collection. Many exhibitors positioned a shaggy jacket at the front of their stands to draw in the crowds – Mads Norgaard’s hot pink faux fur version was among the more eye-catching ones. Meanwhile, J Lindeberg – yet another Scoop first-timer– showcased skaters with shearling panels and fish-scale effect leather (either or, not a mix of the two) alongside subtly flared jeans and leather biker jackets cut slightly longer. A polo neck jumper dress fashioned from a dense, Alaia-esque viscose knit also caught our eye. Scoop newcomer Wood Wood served up a modern interpretation of the 70s, involving stripes in different guises and an interesting approach to textiles, in which organic-looking wools and mohair blends sat alongside fabrics with a more technical feel.

Faux fur jacket by Vanessa Bruno Athé, Scoop International
Faux fur jacket by Vanessa Bruno Athé, Scoop International
Even the most jaded frequenter of trade shows will find Scoop a joy; the vibe is far removed from the rather more corporate set-ups that tend to dominate the circuit. The Saatchi Gallery venue, with its warren of rooms and original artworks, contributes to the uplifting atmosphere. Scoop’s offer is geared towards classic womenswear, but labels catering for younger consumers seamlessly slot in to the mix, though there was lack of denim brands this season. As from the forthcoming summer edition, Scoop International will hold four shows a year, two of which will focus on British designers and coincide with London Fashion Week’s events.

Navy jacket by Gloverall
Navy jacket by Gloverall
The quote that captured the sentiment of many brand representatives: “
There may be fairs that provide better networking opportunities but we found that Scoop scored higher in terms of order-writing.” Susanna Holm, women’s sales UK, J Lindeberg.

Best denim pieces: Mads Norgaard’s quilted, oversize “housecoat” and the bias cut A-line skirt from the same collection.

Most interesting brand development news: Heritage name Gloverall’s new 1951 line, which sees the brand diversify into garment categories other than duffle coats – think shirt dresses, fair isle knits and chunky shawl collar cardigans.