The second edition of denim show BPD Blueprint Expo had a successful two-day run in New York last week.

The small, boutique gathering of fabric mills, manufacturers and industry insiders took place in an empty ground-floor retail space on Wooster Street in SoHo. It had just 15 exhibitors–Kurabo, Calik Denim, KG Denim, Cadica Group, Grandtex, IPU 142, Absolute Denim, Orta Andolu, Mafatlal Industries, Raymond Uco, Tyfountex, Matrix Sourcing, Seazon, WSG and Romatex–which was nearly double the number of the first edition in June.
Show founder and producer Bill Curtin, who owns the Blue Print Denim Wash House in nearby Jersey City, N.J., said he also had a waiting list of seven other brands.
“We expanded on the concept and took it to everybody,” he said. “The main thing is that we are the anti-trade show. I know that’s kind of cliché and I don’t know what the right word is because ‘expo’ is not the right word so eventually we just want to be known as BPD.

The vintage denim flea market
The vintage denim flea market
Highlights of the show included onsite Shibori tie-dye classes, a vintage denim flea-market wall offering jeans for $75 each and individual “Denim Therapy” sessions with expert Michelle Branch, who broke down spring ’17 fabric trends and explained which ones would be most important to each person she met with. “Denim right now is all over the place so the thing we decided to do was that instead of having stupid panels with the same person asking the same question all the time we had just one person for Denim Therapy. Denim trends are what are specific to you whether you are in kids’, juniors’, women’s or men’s. So it was a one-on-one consultation,” Curtin explained.
“But the biggest thing that was the most popular was the creative part, the Shibori,” he added. “We had a wonderful first day and extended it to two days because people loved it. What they liked about it was it being interactive: seeing indigo and touching it.”
The vintage denim flea market
The vintage denim flea market