London Fashion Week, edition F/W ´15 drew to a close on Tuesday night, having served up 78 catwalks shows and presentations by the likes of Christopher Kane, Burberry Prorsum, Belstaff, Hunter Originals, Toga, Palmer/Harding as well as a returning Gareth Pugh.
Oliver Duncan Doherty, international fashion showcase, Ireland
Oliver Duncan Doherty, international fashion showcase, Ireland
Now in its fourth year, the International Fashion Showcase (IFS) is becoming an integral part of LFW. Housed in the mighty Brewer Street Car Park in Soho, the four-day event brought together 110 emerging designers from four continents and 25 countries including Philippines, Austria, Colombia, Brazil, Czech Republic, Georgia, Nigeria, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Tanzania and South Africa. Ireland joined the proceedings for the first time this year, introducing the wares of promising new names such as Michael Stewart and Rory Parnell-Mooney.
Said project director Aisling Farinella: “It’s important to put Irish designers on the map by taking part in a major London Fashion Week event. We’ve selected a few of the strongest emerging talents, all of whom display a high level of conceptual creativity rendered in a rather clean way that draw on their Irish roots.” The woven leather waistcoat by Oliver Duncan Doherty, which enchanted us in particular, drew on the weaving heritage of County Donegal– the rural area in which the designer grew up.

Obscure rebellion
Obscure rebellion
As for denim tendencies, the frayed edges made popular by Marques Almeida a few seasons ago still form part of the duo’s repertoire, while the detail also featured on the hems of Ashish’s knee length skirts, tunics and shorts; these pieces were given further zest by elaborate bleach-work and edgy stud adornment, while fur insets featured on others. Black and white couplings emerged as a definite trend among designers at the Somerset House showroom.
New womenswear label Obscure Rebellion, which gives men’s sportswear a glam makeover, based its entire range around denim in a monochrome palette. Its jeans were skinny and high waisted with circular cut-outs at the knee. Said the label’s co-designer Mignonne Dekyem.  “We wanted to take the distressing trend further by cutting circular shapes into the garment, leaving edges raw but with a row of stitching stopping it from fraying too much. Our pieces are intended for everyday use and denim fits this approach perfectly as it’s durable and allows us to experiment endlessly.” Portuguese designer Alexandra Moura focused on roomy dresses and jackets in cream and dusty black denim, some of which were adorned with ruffles crafted from strips of gently fraying denim. Claire Barrow, meanwhile, presented cropped jean jackets and long pencil skirts with raw edged thigh-high slits – both of which featured squiggly white prints in different renditions.

Claire Barrow
Claire Barrow
Denim didn’t make as many appearances on the catwalk as last season, but it was out in force among the fashion crowd like never before. All manner of jeans and denim pieces were worn – from true blue coats in 80s styling and high-waisted flairs to button-through mini skirts and slim, distressed boyfriend jeans. Proportion was taken to the extreme in some cases – we spotted several dungaree and shrunken biker jacket combos, as well as ribcage-skimming mummy jeans teamed with dangerously tiny crop tops. Many fashion week goers favored embellished denim looks – one particularly elaborate version combined multicolored appliques and heavy pearl encrusting.